Donald Trump seeks a grand bargain with Vladimir Putin

ACEU Staff:

Barack Obama attempted to “reset” relations with Russia, but by the end of his term in office Russia had annexed Crimea, stirred up conflict elsewhere in Ukraine and filled the power vacuum that Mr Obama had left in Syria. Donald Trump appears to want to go much further and forge an entirely new strategic alignment with Russia.

Economist: Donald Trump seeks a grand bargain with Vladimir Putin off-site link graphic

published 13 February 2017: News Summaries

National security adviser Flynn discussed sanctions with Russian ambassador, despite denials

ACEU Staff:

National security adviser Michael Flynn privately discussed U.S. sanctions against Russia with that country’s ambassador to the United States during the month before President Trump took office, contrary to public assertions by Trump officials, current and former U.S. officials said.

WP: National security adviser Flynn discussed sanctions with Russian ambassador, despite denials off-site link graphic

published 13 February 2017: News Summaries

Why are Ukraine’s borders not secure?

ACEU Staff:

Most importantly, Ukraine has moved closer to western values and the western way of life. For the first time in 25 years, western-educated professionals are in government. While not yet at critical mass, such reformers along with civil society are key drivers of Ukraine’s transformation.

FT: Why are Ukraine’s borders not secure? off-site link graphic

published 13 February 2017: News Summaries

The EU Is Thinking About Pre-Trump Sanctions on Russia

ACEU Staff:

With the penalties due to expire on Jan. 31, EU governments are likely to prolong the measures for another six months because the main condition set for lifting them — full respect of a pact aimed at ending the Ukrainian war — has yet to be met.

Bloomberg: The EU Is Thinking About Pre-Trump Sanctions on Russia off-site link graphic

published 29 November 2016: News Summaries

Why Many Young Russians See a Hero in Putin

ACEU Staff:

Today 58 percent of Russians would still like to see a return of the Soviet order, and some 40 percent see Stalin favorably. Russians between the ages of 18 and 24 approve of Putin at a higher rate than any other age group: 88 percent. More than any other generation, they are proud of their country and its stature in the world, associate its military prowess with greatness, and believe in its future.Sixty-five percent of Russians between ages 18 and 24 plan their lives no more than a year or two ahead, according to the Levada Center. Most don’t know about news events the state doesn’t want them to know about, and 83 percent say they have not participated in any kind of political or civil society activity.
“It’s better to know and be quiet. It’s better not to speak up.

NG: Why Many Young Russians See a Hero in Putinoff-site link graphic

published 29 November 2016: News Summaries