News Summaries

http://carnegieeurope.eu/strategiceurope/?fa=64573

ACEU Staff

Much of the almost proverbial Ukraine fatigue is driven by a steady stream of corruption scandals. While each episode is troubling, the widespread attention on these scandals shows just how low the tolerance for corruption now is.

CE: http://carnegieeurope.eu/strategiceurope/?fa=64573 off-site link graphic

published 19 September 2016: News Summaries

Russia’s Opposition, While Repressed, May Be Its Own Worst Enemy

ACEU Staff

Putin, who after a rule of more than 16 years, has wiped the slate of Russian politics clean, with opponents killed, imprisoned, driven into exile or sidelined with fabricated criminal charges. Opposition candidates are barred from appearing on television. With nothing to fight over, Russia’s opposition has been plagued by infighting, further harming its prospects.

NYT: Russia’s Opposition, While Repressed, May Be Its Own Worst Enemy off-site link graphic

published 19 September 2016: News Summaries

Why Russians like Vladimir Putin’s wars

ACEU Staff

Autocratic regimes like Russia realize that public opinion and legitimacy are important for maintaining power. Therefore, they try to control what information their citizens can access by tightly controlling the press and the Internet. This manipulation has been on display in Russia’s ongoing conflict with Ukraine. Two years later, 96 percent of Russians agree that “Crimea is Russia.”

WP:Why Russians like Vladimir Putin’s wars off-site link graphic

published 19 September 2016: News Summaries

Ukraine’s former PM urges west to stand firm on Russian sanctions

ACEU Staff

Referring to pressure to ease sanctions, Mr Yatseniuk said: “This would be the betrayal of the bedrock of the EU and of the bedrock of the free world.”

FT: Ukraine’s former PM urges west to stand firm on Russian sanctions off-site link graphic

published 18 August 2016: News Summaries

Manafort tied to undisclosed foreign lobbying

ACEU Staff

Manafort lobbying included downplaying the necessity of a congressional resolution meant to pressure the Ukrainian leader to release an imprisoned political rival. Under federal law, U.S. lobbyists must declare publicly if they represent foreign leaders or their political parties and provide detailed reports about their actions to the Justice Department. A violation is a felony and can result in up to five years in prison and a fine of up to $250,000.

AP: Manafort tied to undisclosed foreign lobbying off-site link graphic

published 18 August 2016: News Summaries

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From the Editors

http://carnegieeurope.eu/strategiceurope/?fa=64573

The Editors

Much of the almost proverbial Ukraine fatigue is driven by a steady stream of corruption scandals. While each episode is troubling, the widespread attention on these scandals shows just how low the tolerance for corruption now is.

CE: http://carnegieeurope.eu/strategiceurope/?fa=64573 off-site link graphic

published 19 September 2016: News Summaries

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Guest Articles

IN SEARCH OF THE MIRACULOUS

Guest Contributor

By Kirk Bennett

About two months after the Revolution of Dignity drove President Yanukovych out of office in February 2014, I received an e-mail from a fairly apolitical acquaintance in Kyiv. She assured me that, revolution notwithstanding, basically nothing had changed and the country was still being run by a bunch of crooks and scoundrels. I thought at the time that she was just being an understandably cynical Ukrainian, embittered by years of dashed hopes and expecting too much too soon in terms of reform or improvements in living conditions. It turned out she was being exceptionally perceptive, or possibly prescient.

continue reading IN SEARCH OF THE MIRACULOUS →

published 13 May 2016: News Summaries

Timothy Ash: UKRAINE ENTERING ‘SERIOUS POLITICAL CRISIS’: SPEAKER HROISMAN

Guest Contributor

One tip for politicians in places of power – don’t mention the “C” word when u are facing a tricky economic situation.

It reminds me of President Sezer in Turkey in 2001 when he famously (reportedly, but maybe urban legend) threw a copy of the constitution at then PM Ecevit and said “we have a crisis”. Within days the market had taken him at his word, and the crawling peg exchange rate regime had collapsed and the rest is history.

continue reading Timothy Ash: UKRAINE ENTERING ‘SERIOUS POLITICAL CRISIS’: SPEAKER HROISMAN →

published 4 February 2016: Economics, EU, Reform

Moscow’s Battle against Time

Guest Contributor

By Mykola Kapitonenko

Among many other things Russia is trying to achieve in Ukraine, it is desperately struggling to turn back time. Preferably to the good old days when supplies of natural gas to its neighbors energy inefficient economies were successfully converted into political control, or – even better – when military dominance secured regional hegemony.

Kremlin’s ultimate goal is restoring a part of its former greatness. Two years ago Russia was firmly seated among the regional powers. It ranked in the top ten of world economies, enjoyed rocketing prices for natural gas and oil – country’s main commodities, and had become the economic center of gravity for large part of its immediate neighborhood. Powerful Russian lobbies operated in former Soviet republics and took advantage of systemic corruption there. Extra revenues from exporting energy resources enabled Russian leadership to buy influence in those countries, to carry out large-scale military modernization and pump up its military budget, and even to launch projects of regional integration, such as Eurasian Economic Union, tailored to further cement Kremlin’s control over post-Soviet space.

continue reading Moscow’s Battle against Time →

published 8 December 2015: Democracy, Economics, Energy, Europe, Reform, Russia

all articles by Guest Contributors